Sunday, February 10, 2008

Peter Callesen

Half Way Through, 2006

Acid free A4 115 gsm paper, pencil, and glue

We're coming off a fantastic week with Island Press artist Mark Fox. It seems that our work last week involved more cutting than printing. Does anyone want to speculate on the origin and/or significance of the current paper cutting phenomenon in contemporary art?

6 comments:

Jane said...

In terms of our conversation on monoprints/types, I think work involving cut-outs can be seen as unique in a similar way. With Mark Fox's work, we were printing shapes from set templates, however, it is the final arrangement of those cut shapes that will make the individual pieces. Especially when transforming 2D paper shapes into 3D objects, there is plenty of room for variation.

Tony said...

I like paper b/c I can eat it.

Rani said...
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Joey said...

tony, you really shouldn't eat paper.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLXHvBFG-CI
(this is 5 minutes long, but its about a 2 legged dog...so its worth it. Lisa, I swear this is the last one.)

Joey said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
anisa said...

I think that because paper has been used as a means by which the viewer sees the work of art, cutting the paper- the foundation- and making the paper the art itself is something new and exciting especially because all of a sudden it becomes extremely precious-light weight, paper thin (ha) and vulnerable to the elements: weather, sneezing, breathing, etc.