Sunday, January 13, 2008

monoprints

Printmaking is the democratic medium, right? Prints are accessible to the masses because they can be reproduced, and can be available in more than one place at a time. Why make a one-of-a-kind print, a monoprint?

7 comments:

Bull said...

That's a silly question. It's art, for crikey sake!

Tony said...

There are many reasons why I value monoprints, but since I am feeling kind of crotchety, I'm just gonna throw out there that big monoprints allow printmakers to compete with painters, not that its a competition... but we could be taken more seriously from time to time. A monoprint is as sacred as any other one-of-a-kind peice of art.

rani said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tunde O. said...

I think monoprints serve two important semi-paradoxical purposes (for the artist).

1) as a freeing agent: Monoprinting is often quick(er) and generally is the most painter-like method of printing, which makes the connection between the artist and their work stronger by removing a few of the processes, drawing tools, etc. Paving the way for better expression of ideas.

2) as a limiting agent: On the other hand, working with a one-shot method could force the artist to more seriously plan and consider their choices regarding, color, mark-making, laters, etc.

Note: This is all my opinion. I don't claim to know anything.

Alexis said...

I think its natural for an artist to subvert the characteristics of his or her medium. Painting was originally seen as a historical document and strove to represent the truth, but has evolved to celebrate its own materiality.

Joey said...

testing 123

Joey said...

ALSO: So, Huck showed us all the stuff the other day about how to correctly label editions and such and such. And, I guess it just seems like - what does it matter if there's only 1 or there are only 25? The multiple provides printmaking with the OPPORTUNITY to be a democratic medium, but when we value our prints as objects this possibility sort of falls by the wayside. Not that we shouldn't value our prints as objects - we should, but we can't have it both ways, ya know?

(is this question like totally old news? should i even be answering it?)

(not printmaking related)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONmhQJy1ViA